Senior Living on the Suncoast

Living Safely with Encompass Rehab Hospital

April 16, 2021 Steve Bennet-Martin, Margaret Clark Season 2 Episode 3
Senior Living on the Suncoast
Living Safely with Encompass Rehab Hospital
Show Notes Transcript

Steve Bennet-Martin invites Therapy Manager, Margaret Clark, on to discuss ways for seniors to live safely in their own home. Margaret has worked at Encompass Health Rehabilitation Hospital of Sarasota for over three decades and has a passion for helping seniors live as independently as they safely can. 

Topics Discussed Include:

  • Encompass Health Rehabiltation Hospital and what Acute Rehab is
  • Fall Stastitics and their Impact
  • Diagnosis and medications to watch out for
  • How living safely changed with COVID
  • Activities of Daily Living vs Indpendent Activities of Daily Living
  • Making home modications for safety

Call Encompass for help today at 941-921-8600

Support the show (http://www.patreon.com/happylifepod)

Steve:

Hello there everyone. Welcome to senior living on the Suncoast. I'm your host, Steve Bennett, Martin. And I'm happy to bring you the only senior centered podcast to assist us all. As we navigate the complex systems of aging together, up and down, the Suncoast to Florida. My mission with this podcast is to help make sure that the rest of your life is the best of your life, which means today, we'll be talking about how to live safely at home and our guest expert for this. Very important topic is Margaret Clark. She is the therapy manager at encompass health rehabilitation, hospital of Sarasota. Well, welcome to the show, Margaret. Thank you. Yes. And Margaret, before we get into the thick of it, why don't you tell us a little bit about yourself?

Margaret:

Well, I have been an occupational therapist for more years than I would like to confess to. I I'm originally from England and came over here about 30 years ago. And actually have been pretty much working with the same company ever since I came over here. I've held various positions. My current one is the therapy manager. Obviously I'm an occupational therapist by background. And so I have a passion for. Making sure that I make my patients as independent as possible and try and reduce the risks of falls. That's one of our main focuses.

Steve:

Excellent. So I can only imagine working in senior living half. The reasons why I get my move-ins that hardest fitness is because someone had a trip or a spill at home. So, I mean, do you talk about a falls as much as I would guess

Margaret:

you do? We certainly do actually as an occupational therapist, obviously our focus is to make the patients as independent as possible in their functional activities and by functional activities, I'm talking about things that people do on a daily basis. As we get older, obviously our risk factors before increased. And so consequently, when you are performing your daily activities you have to be extra cautious and look at things that you can do too. Either eliminate or at best or at least decrease the risk of falls.

Steve:

Yes. Excellent. And so one thing that I always find it fascinating is just how often falls occur for seniors, because I mean, they're catastrophic when they happen, but tell me about how often falls happen and about some of those fun statistics and numbers that get people scared about.

Margaret:

Right. And I do like to talk about statistics. I think it does actually opened people's eyes as to how. Frequently this can happen and that, and the impact that it can cause to your life. So the most recent statistics that I was able to find indicate that one in four individuals over the age of 65 years old fall every year and two thirds of those who fall more than likely to fall again within six months. Unfortunately, of course, as usual women get a harder wrap than men and we fall a little bit more frequently as I can

Steve:

attest to because you also live longer in a far more.

Margaret:

And that's probably very true. It's also because we're so busy that way you're busy taking

Steve:

care of us,

Margaret:

right. The, the scary part is that falls actually are a leading cause of both fatal and non-fatal injuries with older adults and staggeringly about every 11 seconds and older adult is treated in the ER for a fall. And we're still every 19 minutes in older adult actually dies from a fall. So those are pretty staggering and, and distressing statistics to say the

Steve:

least. Yes. It's certainly is important for us to keep our seniors as safe as possible. And so the fact that falls are such a, a hazard, not just for changing your quality of life, but possibly ending your life is just terrifying. So, you know, we definitely think that it's better to be off the floor than it is to be on the floor and senior living. We're very big components of not falling to begin with. But that gets into why you're here today is to kind of help us get some tips as to how to be able to live safely at home. And one of the bigger parts of that is how not to fall. And so, from what I understand, you have a kind of a system in place for what you, what you call the false free initiative. Yes,

Margaret:

actually that is a national initiative. So. Falls within, without injury also carry a very heavy quality of life impact and a growing number of older adults falling as a result, limit activities and social engagements that can ultimately lead to physical decline, depression, socialization, and feelings of hopelessness. It's not however an inevitable result of aging. I think that's important to note through lifestyle adjustments and fall prevention programs, clinical community partnerships that can actually help to decrease the number of holes. The national falls prevention resource center leads the fall spree initiative. And that includes things like disseminating fall prevention programs to communities, advocating for funding for education and educating older adults about how to reduce the risk of falls. Funnily enough, the national fall prevention awareness day is guest switch day. What day is it the first day of fall, which is

Steve:

kind of fun. I get it.

Margaret:

Yes, state. So definitely encouraged to host and promote falls prevention and awareness and screening activities to draw attention to the problem and offer older adults practical solutions.

Steve:

Yeah, well, that sounds great. And I know that there are so many different things that can result in false, but what are some diagnoses that people might occur, you know, run into as they get older, that could cause that kind of red flag of watch out watch out falls are more likely.

Margaret:

Well there's a lot of diagnoses that can lead to falls, but I think you know, some of the health factors that some of the actual health factors that can lead to falls, so things like osteoporosis, obviously, if you have osteoporosis, You're more likely to fracture. If you fall things like any cardiac events or respiratory events, stroke is a huge potential factor because obviously there could be residual weakness from a stroke on one side visual impact medication, side effects, blood pressure changes other medical conditions, things like Parkinson's muscular multiple sclerosis. You know, where that can be a weakness or a change in the ability to be able to walk or function. A lot of these are things like blood sugar changes, the stimulus system issues, visual and hearing impairments. And obviously just as we get older, Muscle weakness in the lower extremities, neuropathy and decreased sensation. You know, all of these things can actually contribute to your risk factors for falling, but those, a lot of those factors can actually be controlled. That's the good thing. You know, if you have blood pressure issues, obviously there is medication that hopefully can control that. So you don't get those changes in blood pressure blood sugar changes or things that we can do to help with. Diabetes and those kinds of things. So, you know, some things can be controllable. There are things that we can actually control.

Steve:

Yes. And while there are things that we control, which from sure, we're going to spend a lot of time talking about. Sometimes things are also uncontrollable from what I understand, because even a young, very agile woman as yourself can be the victim of a fault.

Margaret:

That is absolutely true. And I have to be, I honestly, I will come fast. I have probably fallen four times in the last year, mostly because of inattention. Because that's a huge factor for we'll talk about that later. You know, for, you know, paying attention to what you're doing. I actually, ironically enough was going to do this presentation yesterday. I was on my way upstairs to do the presentation on fall prevention and safety and managed to fall on the stairs while I was actually carrying way too many things at the same time. So I couldn't hold onto the handrail. So. Yes, it does happen too. I liked the way that you said young and healthy. I don't know that I would class myself as necessarily that young, but anyway, we work

Steve:

in senior living. It's a sliding scale, but I know that even my, my self being in my thirties and attention is something huge that anyone has at any point in time. And I didn't fall on. Fall, like you wouldn't have to write an incident report in a community, but I did just jam my hip into like a table next to me as I was learning. Cause we just moved into the community at hardest Venice for our listeners a couple of days ago. And so I'm still learning a lot of my spacing and apparently in the main hallway we'll be walking up and down. There's a table to your left that you can see if you look with your eyes, but you don't necessarily feel it. If you're not looking. And so I wasn't feeling it and I just walked right into it and I know I'll have a bruise. So, you know, I can imagine if I was less careful or if I had something else in my hands that even I would have ended up on the floor. So I also know just from my experience, a lot of times seniors seem to have trouble talking about falls because of the shame of, you know, I fell like, what does that mean for me? And so that's why I like to try and dispel that when you false can happen to you, absolutely

Margaret:

false or a fact of life, whether we like it or not. And actually you hit on a really good point though, because if we do have a fall and we do have falls at our facility, we're a very active facility. We're a rehab hospital and therefore we're getting our patients up and on their feet all the time. And sometimes they fall. It's unfortunate, but it does happen. And I can guarantee you 75% of the time, the patients don't necessarily hurt themselves. They hurt the pride, a huge factor, you know, that they're embarrassed by the fact that they're ending up on the floor. So you know it, but it is, it's a fact of life, unfortunately we all

Steve:

fall. Yeah. And in addition to the diagnosis, like diagnoses or health concerns in general, that might cause some fall risk factors, medications, oftentimes I know can cause way more side effects sometimes then what they're actually treating. And so are there any medications that you might be on that you might want to have that kind of. Similarly, like a red flag of like, I need to be a little more careful about my balance or watch out for side effects that are

Margaret:

coming. Yeah. Yeah. Certainly any blood pressure medications you probably want to be aware of? Definitely things like Parkinson's meds can definitely impact your falls. You know, I'm not a physician, so I'm not really fully aware of. The names of medications and that kind of thing. I would just be very cautious, especially when you're looking at interactions with medications too, because you may be taking something for a certain condition and then you take another one that interacts with it. Of course, it's a

Steve:

problem. And I, and from my experience, the times that that becomes an issue is when the seniors don't have a list of their medications that they're able to share with all of their physicians. Right. Because it was very common. And if you're not paying attention to it, like from my experience, you might go to one doctor who prescribes you, the antidepressant depressant. And then you might go to this one doctor who prescribes you this thing for your heart. And then you might go to this one person who prescribed you this other thing for something else that might be happening. And before you know it, if you're not sharing with all your physicians, everything you're taking, the medications are going to interact and something's going to go wrong. Yeah. And so other than, you know, the idea of having your medication list ready to share with your doctor, I think that in general, the communication is very important with that and research

Margaret:

totally. And technology's a wonderful thing. And, you know, we all have a lot of us have these smartphones now, and you can get all sorts of wonderful apps that track and you can list your actual medications on and track when you're taking them, that kind of thing, which is really important when you do go to a physician's office because. I can guarantee you several people are not just on one medication. You know, they're on a lot of medications and remembering them all. When somebody asks you is almost

Steve:

impossible. Yes. I, I think I, I know that the national average last time I checked and it could, this number could be out of date. I believe it was between like seven and nine hours. I think it was eight. Where am I most seniors over the age of six, like 65 or 75 are taking like eight medications. And again, give or take one. So don't, don't quote me on it, but yeah, but it is more than five that most seniors are taking on a daily basis. And the number of times I've done like an assessment you know, where they're like, well, the, the, the blue ones, my one I take at night and it does something. And in the morning I take this oblong one and I think that that might be either a vitamin or it might be something for my heart. You know, th you don't always know what you're taking because it doesn't sink in the bottle. This is your heart pill. It says the brand name or the generic name. And you might not, you can't keep track of all of them because we're not doctors. That's exactly right. And so I know that in addition to falls there are a lot more dangerous in your home that you can run into and COVID has made us more aware of. Things going on in our home than ever. So as much as being an evergreen podcasts where hopefully many of our listeners who are listening to this to say, what was COVID, you know how right now in early 20, 21 has COVID affected seniors the past year with being safe at home.

Margaret:

We round on our patients and this particular patient is in my room. And unfortunately he has a diagnosis of dementia on top of everything else that he's dealing with. And his wife was telling me that over the past year, I think because he was not able to go and do a lot of the social things that he was able to do before, because people were sort of confined to their spaces a little bit more, that he has shown her decline and is consequently in our hospital because he failed. So he's not able to participate in some of the activities that he was able to do before, maybe a you know, exercise group, that kind of thing. He just hasn't. And so consequently has declined and I think that's happened with a lot of people. I think people have stopped being as active as they should. As they maybe were before, you know, I don't know about you, but I personally, I don't go into grocery store anymore. I don't even walk around the groceries

Steve:

anymore. Things going to keep me from food, but I don't shop the way that I used to like, and now I fully use that Amazon prime to its fullest. Oh my

Margaret:

goodness. So do I, I have not been in a grocery store for the last 12 12 months. Instacart is a wonderful thing. Have you never heard about

Steve:

Instacart? I, I I've. I've heard of it, but I mean, I don't know. I've, I'm weird that I love the grocery store. My, my husband's like more power to you. I never have to step foot in there again, unless you make me

Margaret:

see this. Isn't being a really nice excuse for me not to go to the grocery store. Cause I, yeah. Absolutely hate grocery shopping. So, so yes, I have these wonderful people who I admire tremendously go and do my shopping for me. And it's lovely. But as a consequence to that, I think a lot of people are doing similar things and they're not doing those, those forced activities that kept them very active before. So I think that's how it's really impacted. Plus just the social time with families and, you know, the ability to be able to. Go out to a restaurant and have a meal and not feel uncomfortable about it. You know, those kinds of things. So I'm hoping that things are beginning to get better. I personally still am very limited as to what I do socially. But I think that's really how it's impacted. Some of the patients, you know, that fearful of going outside that fearful of going to the. Yeah.

Steve:

And I mean, it's terrifying because I, all, my other podcast is more pop culture based even like last night I was watching last week's Grey's anatomy, but like, they were talking about that about how a lot of it is like fear. Or they had a patient where it was like, he was so afraid to go out, to go to the dentist because at the dentist, you have to leave your mouth open and have someone looking in that he might catch COVID that he didn't get his dental infection treated. And it ended up like leading to like a life altering problem where it's like, you know, he was in the hospital and if he didn't get help, he'd be dead. But he would like, he was so afraid of being around people because of the fear. Of COVID or of catching COVID or dying from COVID or getting sick that he was afraid to go out. And so, you know what you're saying? Just like, you know, Hopefully things are getting better as the vaccine becomes more readily available. But fear, I think is something that's going to persist a little bit longer because even my, my mom and my dad, like recently, like we're all vaccinating out. Thankfully for me being in the healthcare, my husband being in healthcare and both of them being over the age of 65, but even with all four of us vaccine, my mom, like the first time we went in for a hug, she was like uncomfortable and recoiled a little bit. Cause she's like, I haven't anyone, but like your father who barely hugs me to begin with like hug me. And over a year, like she she's, like, I like, she's like my heart like knows it's okay. But she's like part of like my brain or like my instincts are telling me that like, it's still wrong because you're like afraid at that

Margaret:

point. But I think that's that's because it has gone on for so long. And I think the, the other side of, of the COVID world is that it's, it's almost been really more important for people to focus on, you know, more healthy living lifestyles, like eating more healthily. Making sure they are exercising, even if they can't do it. You know, with the people that they were doing it before just being hyper aware. I mean, my parents are in England, very elderly from

Steve:

England. Really? I didn't notice any sort of accent.

Margaret:

I don't notice it personally. So my mom's

Steve:

hours

Margaret:

I do have mine. Mommy's is 95. My, my dad is 93 and acts like a 70 year old. But they both still live independently in a two story home. But I, every morning I call them and every morning I tell them, do not do anything foolish because the last place. You want to be right now is in the hospital. I mean, no disrespect to our hospital, but it is the last place I would want my parents to be. Yeah.

Steve:

I was going to say, you got you guys when I hear people like that are there. I'm always like, you're in the best hands. Like you could possibly be right now. And I even had someone called this morning that said, you know, my, my dad's at encompass and now I'm looking for care and maybe having him discharge to your community. And I'm like, you know, Hey, we're not open yet. So can encompass keep them until. You know June. And I know that the answer is probably no, because you guys are known. Yeah. Cause you guys are known for being in the rehab, like where you get people better and you get them home where they want to be, which is so important because that's where people want to be in the, you do it just so well,

Margaret:

you. You know, he's never going to have an accident. One of these days, he will have an accident. And then my mom's in trouble because she can't really look after herself anymore. So really, really important to focus on, you know, the way that you do things right now and what you're doing and how you're doing things and eating healthfully and, you know, staying as activity. It's possible.

Steve:

Yes. And I know, I know tan from all of my experiences, trying to be better and live a healthier and happier life that sometimes making these new behaviors of being more conscious of the space around you and being more cognitive of that thing, you might trip over. It can be hard. Are there things that we can do in advance to avoid some of these risk factors in our home that could cause these falls so that we can. Like, you know, if I'm a little bit unaware of my surroundings, you know, that I won't necessarily lead to a fall.

Margaret:

Yes. I think there are lots of things. And actually that's one of the things that we can do to reduce the risk of falls. He's looking at our environment and making sure that it's as safe as possible. So prime thing with OT. You never have throw rocks on the floor. That is the last thing that you want on the floor, because you're gonna fall. You're in a trip you're using a Walker. The corner of it gets flipped up you're down on the floor. So that's a big

Steve:

deal. I was gonna say that they're so pretty though. I was gonna say, but I think at that point, the question is, are they pretty enough to fall and break your neck?

Margaret:

Well, you know what? We have people who. They say yes, they are pretty enough to, to fall and maybe, hopefully not break your neck, but maybe break something else. And so, yes. I mean, it's, you know, you can make recommendations. There are lots of things. So things like making sure that the clutter is decreased to the minimal, if you, especially, if you using some kind of an ambulation device, a Walker, you want plenty of room to be able to maneuver around. I don't know about you. But I have a nice big coffee table in front of my sofa, which is fine because I can negotiate around it. However, if you are walking with a Walker, try negotiating around a coffee table you know, when you're trying to get to the chair, it's not going to be very easy. So that's something that you might want to consider rearranging your furniture so that it makes it as easy as possible for you to get to 80, to be okay. Be very cognizant of different surfaces on the floor. We all have different surfaces like that. Wood floors, tile floors.

Steve:

And that, that's the thing that you said that last part, the change of surface I noticed is what hurts is like, you know, it's important to know whether you're walking on carpet or hardwood flooring, but when you're, once you're already on it and you're walking, it's not that hard, but any surface where you're going from one service to another should begin in my experience, a red flag of, you know, watch your staff at any age.

Margaret:

Absolutely. As we get older, of course our vision I will attest to this does not improve. It certainly does not. And so, you know, good lighting, it makes a huge difference, making sure that you're aware or of where the edge of a step is or a, again, the change of surface, making sure you have lights on at night, if you need to go to the bathroom, not necessarily glaring lights, but nightlights so that you can actually see where you're going. You know, it's funny at our house. You know, we have, I call it my landing strip, you know, that you can actually come out to the bedroom and there were things like the coffee pot and the microwave always has a little digital clock on it. And it kind of lights your way as to where you're going when you're getting up in the morning. But having things like nightlights in the bathroom, in the hallways, you know, in your bedrooms, so that if you do have to get up in the night, you've got something that will. Not w will actually guide you to where you need to go safely.

Steve:

I've only learned recently that, like how much, whenever you say certain words like nightlight, how much like the, the image in people's minds can be different and change what they think. And so I just want to say for someone who like. You know, about a year ago you know, adopted an adult child that needed a nightlight though for a short while that like, they make them nowadays where it's just an led light in an outlet where if the lights are on, you wouldn't know as a nightlight, like, it's not like you have to worry about picking out something that might have a superhero or a princess on it. You don't have to worry about changing your dignity or even having people know that you have these nightlights on, because how often are people in your homes when all the lights are off? And they automatically go on. So, so yeah, it again with a pride, because that's the biggest obstacle. I think a lot of seniors face during their care, you know, nightlights are not the nightlights that you got for your children when you were raising them nightlight. Yes. It has some really

Margaret:

nice ones I

Steve:

can assure you. Exactly. They have some that you might find on a nice accessory for your bathroom. That would like be so visually appealing to the eye that you might overcome that. So, yes, nightlights, certainly I can only help.

Margaret:

Things like, you know we talked a little bit about rearranging furniture, but one of the highest risk factors are things like overreaching for items. And you know, I've seriously got into this whole organizational thing that you had has been some really cool programs on an organization. My husband absolutely crazy.

Steve:

I know several times the organization has been like trending even on like Twitter with organization.

Margaret:

It's crazy. So my whole. Kitchen. And my whole closet has completely been rearranged and organized because of Marie Conde. I will tell you, but anyway, just rearranged jinx, something so that if you're frequently using something you're not having to overreach or reach down for it, you know, those that's where, when you reaching out of your base of support, that's where you increase the risk of overbalancing and falling. So just something as simple as just rearranging things, making things a little bit more organized. Can make a huge difference. You know? The other thing that we do look at is, you know, for somebody show it like me getting over a lower surface is not that big of a deal, but when we've got people who are not quite so vertically challenged as I am, you know, it gets a little bit more of a struggle when you're trying to get up and down off a low surface. So a low comfy sofa might not be your best choice to sit on because it's going to be a struggle for you to get up. And that again, increases your risk factors. There are things you can do low toilets. You know, even my daughter is so funny when she was a little girl, she told her friends at school, they had to tell them what their parents did. And my daughter in front of the whole class told her friends that I help people on and off the toilet. That was that. So anyway, so, but low toilets. No, she's not. No, she is not. I have to say. At the time I was actually working in the community and I actually carried toilet seats around in my car. So that probably has something to do with it. But yeah, just even a highboy toilet, toilet, believe it or not. Do you know how tall that is? How high it is?

Steve:

One, two feet,

Margaret:

17 inches. Well, she would think it would be higher than that. A surface. An easy surface to get off. Most of the time is between 18 and 20 inches. So even the high boy Charlottes that they make now are only 17 inches. A low toilet is 14 inches. Why are we talking about that? Well, because getting on and off a toilet is an essential part of life. It is whether you

Steve:

like it, unless you're a bear in the woods, doesn't help you. This

Margaret:

is true. So. Looking at the height of the toilet. If you're having difficulty with that, that's a huge problem. And it could be a huge risk factor for falling. So people

Steve:

probably go to the bathroom more often than

Margaret:

they eat meals. They may do that. You don't know this is going down the wrong path. Okay.

Steve:

Yes. Well, getting back on the right path then, I mean, I would say that, you know, with, with keeping safe in your home, a lot of it is being kept off the floor and just trying to. So live your safest in your home. And so what are, do you have any final kind of like last minute tips or advice for how to keep your home safe?

Margaret:

Yes. Well, one of the things that you can do is definitely looking at adaptive equipment to help, to make your environmental little easier. So you can put things like grab bars in your shower, shower seats in your shower. That's one of the highest places I've had patients who have fallen in the shower and not being able to get out. You know, another thing that I always recommend is, you know, we now have cell phones, we have portable firms. I always tell people, please take the phone into the bathroom with you when you're on your own heaven, forbid that you fall put it on the toilet seat. The chances are you're going to be able to reach it and you can summon help. You know, I've had patients who've been in the bathtub for three days because nobody knew they were there. Things like wearing the life alert systems. That's an awesome technology, you know, they now have the ones that if you actually fall, it automatically triggers a response, which is again, essential. You know, you want to make sure that if something happens to you, you're going to get a quick response to it. Again, just look at your environment, look at what you can do to make it as safe as possible to get around, pay attention to what you're doing, you know Let the phone go to voicemail. That's one of the things my dad has a really difficult time with you'll launch himself from the garden into the house, just because the phone is ringing. Even though I tell him, dad, you have an answering machine and somebody who is needing to talk to you, they're gonna, they're gonna call you back. So, you know, just some simple things that you can do to actually make it safer risk, you know, falls are a fact of life. It's it's unfortunate, but they are, you know, you hope that if you do fall, you know, you're not going to injure yourself terribly, but there are definitely things that you can be proactive about in making sure that you are keeping a safe as possible. So again, just consider the environment, consider paying attention to what you're doing. Consider using adaptive equipment. If you need to. I know again, we were talking about the pride thing before a lot of patients. Or a lot of people, my mom included do not like to use a Walker because they think it makes them look. Oh yeah. You know, so that, even something as simple as I is going to make it a lot safer.

Steve:

Oh yeah. And one thing I've learned from my experience at least is to use a Walker or cane before you like necessarily absolutely need it. Because it gets easier to

Margaret:

use. Yes, it does. And also big point here, make sure that the equipment that you're using is adjusted correctly for you because you know, we have patients again that come in and say, Oh yeah, I have a Walker. It used to belong to my husband and they're five foot, two like me. And I'm like, how tall was your husband? Well, he was six foot two, and I'm like, diet is probably not going to work

Steve:

the difference. Yes. So it's been so great having you on talking about all of the different ways to try and keep yourself safe at home. And of course, if anyone can keep themselves safe at home. At hardest Venice, we do offer an independent living and assisted living for us to assist you on that journey. But if someone needs specific help in terms of their rehabilitation, what would be the best phone number for someone to call for help with rehab?

Margaret:

A facility and the programs that we have, the so that would be the number to contact.

Steve:

Excellent. And I'll add this number as well as the following number to the show notes for anyone who's listening to just scroll down to see, but also if you're one of our many professionals that listen, if you're interested in having a Margaret's beautiful sultry voice, come on and do a presentation in your community about this or many other topics. The best person to reach would be Amy. O'Connor the compass extraordinary, and you can reach her at (941) 705-7070. And thank you listeners for listening to this episode of senior living on the Suncoast. You can also reach out to me directly for any questions, feedback, or requests for future episode topics at nine 41. Nope, you can reach [email protected] That's H a P P Y L I F E P O [email protected] And until next time, stay happy and stay healthy and stay off the floor.